Core review, co-chair’s report

The last core review meeting of the academic year — and reaching back now four years — took place on Monday, October 23. The committee affirmed the proposal submitted to it by the Natural Science CART. The committee also discussed its final report to C & T and Faculty Council. That report should be ready for submission by midweek.

Core review, Monday, October 23, 3:30 p.m., SF 117, plus co-chair’s report

The seventh — and perhaps last? — core review meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Monday, October 23, 3:30 p.m., in Sheehy-Farmer 117. The agenda is to discuss the committee’s final report to C & T and Faculty Council.

At our October 16 meeting, the committee 1) affirmed the proposal submitted to us by the social science division for Social Science II and 2) voted on a model to submit with our final report.

Core review, Monday, October 16, 3:30 p.m., SF 117, plus co-chair’s report

The sixth core review meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Monday, October 16, 3:30-5:00 p.m., in Sheehy-Farmer 117. The agenda is to conclude our discussion of the structure of a revised core.

At the committee’s Monday, October 9 meeting, a motion was passed asking the social science faculty to describe further Social Science II. The committee was satisfied with the description of the history courses under Social Science II; the second sort of course under the umbrella — largely but not exclusively political science courses — needs comparable description.

The committee’s discussion of possible structures for a revised core yielded no consensus.

Core review, Monday, 10/2, SF 117, 3:30 p.m., plus co-chair’s report

The core review committee’s fourth meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Monday, October 2, 3:30 p.m., in Sheehy-Farmer 117. The agenda is to discuss the structure of the revised core, in particular possible clusters.

At our well-attended Monday, 9/25 meeting, the committee voted 1) to affirm 2/3 of the Natural Science CART’s proposal for a second natural science course and 2) to ask the CART to re-draft the last 1/3 — that is, the questions for weeks 11-15 and the brief statement of what instructors should do in the final unit of the course.  The committee agreed in encouraging the Natural Science CART to reach out to the social science faculty in doing this re-drafting — though with the understanding that the course remains a natural science course, not a shared natural science-social science undertaking.

Core review, Monday, 9/25, 3:30 p.m., SF 117, plus co-chair’s report

The core review committee’s third meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Monday, 9/25, 3:30-5:00 p.m., in Sheehy-Farmer 117.  We plan to discuss the second natural science course proposed for the revised core and the cluster entitled “The Person and the Common Good.” It is likely we also will discuss further the cluster entitled “Global Citizenship,” with an eye toward the role of the history department in that cluster (or not). Finally, we hope to discuss a proposal from the social science division regarding the category of courses entitled “Global Connections.”

At our 9/18 meeting, we affirmed the documents submitted to the committee by the summer working group on the College Seminar and Learning Community. The committee also affirmed the vote of the social science division to include the following courses in Social Science I: macro-economics, introduction to economics, introduction to psychology, introduction to sociology, introduction to geography, and cultural anthropology.

Core review, Monday, 9/18, 3:30 p.m., Sheehy-Farmer 117, plus co-chair’s report

The second core review meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Monday, 9/18, 3:30-5:00 p.m., in Sheehy-Farmer 117. The agenda is the same as that of our first meeting, namely, to work toward tying up loose ends from academic year 2016-2017: among others, details of the Learning Community/College Seminar; the array of courses under Social Science I; the aims of Natural Science II: “Science and Society”; and the category “Global Connections” in the cluster entitled “Global Citizenship.”

On 9/18, the committee’s focus likely will be on Social Science I and the Learning Community/College Seminar.

During the committee’s first meeting, on 9/6, members voted unanimously to place Social Science I in the core gateway and to place Natural Science II: “Science and Society” (or “Science in Society”?) in the cluster entitled “The Person and the Common Good.”

Core Review, Wednesday, 9/6, 3:30 p.m., Lipo Room

The first core review meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Wednesday, 9/6, 3:30-4:30 p.m., in the Lipo Room, third floor of the Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center. (Note: no longer 8:00 a.m., as previously scheduled.) The agenda is to begin to tie up the loose ends of last year’s business: 1) the placement of Natural Science II: Science and Society; 2) the content and placement of Social Science I; 3) details concerning Social Science II: Global Connections (Quest for Justice?); 4) details concerning the College Seminar/Learning Community.

Agenda, Core Review Committee, Thursday, May 11, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Lipo Room

The core review committee’s twenty-seventh meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Thursday, May 11, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., in the Lipo Room of the Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center. The agenda is twofold: 1) to try to make a decision regarding the course “Science & Society” (the analogue of 270), which has become entangled with our discussion of the roles of social science faculty in a revised core; and 2) to decide on membership for one or possibly two summer subcommittees to advance our work.

Agenda, Core Review Committee, Thursday, May 4, 8:30 a.m., SF 115

The core review committee’s twenty-seventh meeting of the academic year is scheduled for Thursday, May 4, 8:30 a.m., in SF 115. The agenda is twofold: 1) to discuss the roles of the social science faculty in a revised core, especially with respect to the possible course “Science & Society”; 2) to discuss next steps, in particular forming committees to work on the logistics of a learning community and the conception of “Science & Society,” should it move ahead.

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